A Public Defender Shares Thoughts of Race

Allen West shared this article and I would really like to hear some thoughts about his article. I do have to say that I know plenty of people of all races that show the behaviors, attitudes and mentality he talks about. Its interesting how I hadn’t thought about their behaviors etc until I read this. No matter what gender, race or ethnicity – I find these things very irritating. Seems to me that he is making very broad assumptions about entire races and genders based on his experiences, but I guess in some ways we all do that to some degree. We all see things from our perspective and our life experiences.

This is the post – feel free to share your thoughts below…

Confessions of a Public Defender

Michael Smith, American Renaissance, May 9, 2014

Still liberal after all these years.

I am a public defender in a large southern metropolitan area. Fewer than ten percent of the people in the area I serve are black but over 90 per cent of my clients are black. The remaining ten percent are mainly Hispanics but there are a few whites.

I have no explanation for why this is, but crime has racial patterns. Hispanics usually commit two kinds of crime: sexual assault on children and driving under the influence. Blacks commit many violent crimes but very few sex crimes. The handful of whites I see commit all kinds of crimes. In my many years as a public defender I have represented only three Asians, and one was half black.

As a young lawyer, I believed the official story that blacks are law abiding, intelligent, family-oriented people, but are so poor they must turn to crime to survive. Actual black behavior was a shock to me.

The media invariably sugarcoat black behavior. Even the news reports of the very crimes I dealt with in court were slanted. Television news intentionally leaves out unflattering facts about the accused, and sometimes omits names that are obviously black. All this rocked my liberal, tolerant beliefs, but it took me years to set aside my illusions and accept the reality of what I see every day. I have now served thousands of blacks and their families, protecting their rights and defending them in court. What follow are my observations.

Although blacks are only a small percentage of our community, the courthouse is filled with them: the halls and gallery benches are overflowing with black defendants, families, and crime victims. Most whites with business in court arrive quietly, dress appropriately, and keep their heads down. They get in and get out–if they can–as fast as they can. For blacks, the courthouse is like a carnival. They all seem to know each other: hundreds and hundreds each day, gossiping, laughing loudly, waving, and crowding the halls.

When I am appointed to represent a client I introduce myself and explain that I am his lawyer. I explain the court process and my role in it, and I ask the client some basic questions about himself. At this stage, I can tell with great accuracy how people will react. Hispanics are extremely polite and deferential. An Hispanic will never call me by my first name and will answer my questions directly and with appropriate respect for my position. Whites are similarly respectful.

A black man will never call me Mr. Smith; I am always “Mike.” It is not unusual for a 19-year-old black to refer to me as “dog.” A black may mumble complaints about everything I say, and roll his eyes when I politely interrupt so I can continue with my explanation. Also, everything I say to blacks must be at about the third-grade level. If I slip and use adult language, they get angry because they think I am flaunting my superiority.

At the early stages of a case, I explain the process to my clients. I often do not yet have the information in the police reports. Blacks are unable to understand that I do not yet have answers to all of their questions, but that I will by a certain date. They live in the here and the now and are unable to wait for anything. Usually, by the second meeting with the client I have most of the police reports and understand their case.

Unlike people of other races, blacks never see their lawyer as someone who is there to help them. I am a part of the system against which they are waging war. They often explode with anger at me and are quick to blame me for anything that goes wrong in their case.

Black men often try to trip me up and challenge my knowledge of the law or the facts of the case. I appreciate sincere questions about the elements of the offense or the sentencing guidelines, but blacks ask questions to test me. Unfortunately, they are almost always wrong in their reading, or understanding, of the law, and this can cause friction. I may repeatedly explain the law, and provide copies of the statute showing, for example, why my client must serve six years if convicted, but he continues to believe that a hand-written note from his “cellie” is controlling law.

The risks of trial

The Constitution allows a defendant to make three crucial decisions in his case. He decides whether to plea guilty or not guilty. He decides whether to have a bench trial or a jury trial. He decides whether he will testify or whether he will remain silent. A client who insists on testifying is almost always making a terrible mistake, but I cannot stop him.

Most blacks are unable to speak English well. They cannot conjugate verbs. They have a poor grasp of verb tenses. They have a limited vocabulary. They cannot speak without swearing. They often become hostile on the stand. Many, when they testify, show a complete lack of empathy and are unable to conceal a morality based on the satisfaction of immediate, base needs. This is a disaster, especially in a jury trial. Most jurors are white, and are appalled by the demeanor of uneducated, criminal blacks.

Prosecutors are delighted when a black defendant takes the stand. It is like shooting fish in a barrel. However, the defense usually gets to cross-examine the black victim, who is likely to make just as bad an impression on the stand as the defendant. This is an invaluable gift to the defense, because jurors may not convict a defendant—even if they think he is guilty—if they dislike the victim even more than they dislike the defendant.

Most criminal cases do not go to trial. Often the evidence against the accused is overwhelming, and the chances of conviction are high. The defendant is better off with a plea bargain: pleading guilty to a lesser charge and getting a lighter sentence.

The decision to plea to a lesser charge turns on the strength of the evidence. When blacks ask the ultimate question—”Will we win at trial?”—I tell them I cannot know, but I then describe the strengths and weaknesses of our case. The weaknesses are usually obvious: There are five eyewitnesses against you. Or, you made a confession to both the detective and your grandmother. They found you in possession of a pink cell phone with a case that has rhinestones spelling the name of the victim of the robbery. There is a video of the murderer wearing the same shirt you were wearing when you were arrested, which has the words “In Da Houz” on the back, not to mention you have the same “RIP Pookie 7/4/12” tattoo on your neck as the man in the video. Etc.

If you tell a black man that the evidence is very harmful to his case, he will blame you. “You ain’t workin’ fo’ me.” “It like you workin’ with da State.” Every public defender hears this. The more you try to explain the evidence to a black man, the angrier he gets. It is my firm belief many black are unable to discuss the evidence against them rationally because they cannot view things from the perspective of others. They simply cannot understand how the facts in the case will appear to a jury.

This inability to see things from someone else’s perspective helps explain why there are so many black criminals. They do not understand the pain they are inflicting on others. One of my robbery clients is a good example. He and two co-defendants walked into a small store run by two young women. All three men were wearing masks. They drew handguns and ordered the women into a back room. One man beat a girl with his gun. The second man stood over the second girl while the third man emptied the cash register. All of this was on video.

My client was the one who beat the girl. When he asked me, “What are our chances at trial?” I said, “Not so good.” He immediately got angry, raised his voice, and accused me of working with the prosecution. I asked him how he thought a jury would react to the video. “They don’t care,” he said. I told him the jury would probably feel deeply sympathetic towards these two women and would be angry at him because of how he treated them. I asked him whether he felt bad for the women he had beaten and terrorized. He told me what I suspected—what too many blacks say about the suffering of others: “What do I care? She ain’t me. She ain’t kin. Don’t even know her.”

No fathers

As a public defender, I have learned many things about people. One is that defendants do not have fathers. If a black even knows the name of his father, he knows of him only as a shadowy person with whom he has absolutely no ties. When a client is sentenced, I often beg for mercy on the grounds that the defendant did not have a father and never had a chance in life. I have often tracked down the man’s father–in jail–and have brought him to the sentencing hearing to testify that he never knew his son and never lifted a finger to help him. Often, this is the first time my client has ever met his father. These meetings are utterly unemotional.

Many black defendants don’t even have mothers who care about them. Many are raised by grandmothers after the state removes the children from an incompetent teenaged mother. Many of these mothers and grandmothers are mentally unstable, and are completely disconnected from the realities they face in court and in life. A 47-year-old grandmother will deny that her grandson has gang ties even though his forehead is tattooed with a gang sign or slogan. When I point this out in as kind and understanding way as I can, she screams at me. When black women start screaming, they invoke the name of Jesus and shout swear words in the same breath.

Black women have great faith in God, but they have a twisted understanding of His role. They do not pray for strength or courage. They pray for results: the satisfaction of immediate needs. One of my clients was a black woman who prayed in a circle with her accomplices for God’s protection from the police before they would set out to commit a robbery.

The mothers and grandmothers pray in the hallways–not for justice, but for acquittal. When I explain that the evidence that their beloved child murdered the shop keeper is overwhelming, and that he should accept the very fair plea bargain I have negotiated, they will tell me that he is going to trial and will “ride with the Lord.” They tell me they speak to God every day and He assures them that the young man will be acquitted.

The mothers and grandmothers do not seem to be able to imagine and understand the consequences of going to trial and losing. Some–and this is a shocking reality it took me a long time to grasp–don’t really care what happens to the client, but want to make it look as though they care. This means pounding their chests in righteous indignation, and insisting on going to trial despite terrible evidence. They refuse to listen to the one person–me–who has the knowledge to make the best recommendation. These people soon lose interest in the case, and stop showing up after about the third or fourth court date. It is then easier for me to convince the client to act in his own best interests and accept a plea agreement.

Part of the problem is that underclass black women begin having babies at age 15. They continue to have babies, with different black men, until they have had five or six. These women do not go to school. They do not work. They are not ashamed to live on public money. They plan their entire lives around the expectation that they will always get free money and never have to work. I do not see this among whites, Hispanics, or any other people.

The black men who become my clients also do not work. They get social security disability payments for a mental defect or for a vague and invisible physical ailment. They do not pay for anything: not for housing (Grandma lives on welfare and he lives with her), not for food (Grandma and the baby-momma share with him), and not for child support. When I learn that my 19-year-old defendant does not work or go to school, I ask, “What do you do all day?” He smiles. “You know, just chill.” These men live in a culture with no expectations, no demands, and no shame.

If you tell a black to dress properly for trial, and don’t give specific instructions, he will arrive in wildly inappropriate clothes. I represented a woman who was on trial for drugs; she wore a baseball cap with a marijuana leaf embroidered on it. I represented a man who wore a shirt that read “rules are for suckers” to his probation hearing. Our office provides suits, shirts, ties, and dresses for clients to wear for jury trials. Often, it takes a whole team of lawyers to persuade a black to wear a shirt and tie instead of gang colors.

Marijuana

From time to time the media report that although blacks are 12 percent of the population they are 40 percent of the prison population. This is supposed to be an outrage that results from unfair treatment by the criminal justice system. What the media only hint at is another staggering reality: recidivism. Black men are arrested and convicted over and over. It is typical for a black man to have five felony convictions before the age of 30. This kind of record is rare among whites and Hispanics, and probably even rarer among Asians.

Stats

At one time our office was looking for a motto that defined our philosophy. Someone joked that it should be: “Doesn’t everyone deserve an eleventh chance?”

I am a liberal. I believe that those of us who are able to produce abundance have a moral duty to provide basic food, shelter, and medical care for those who cannot care for themselves. I believe we have this duty even to those who can care for themselves but don’t. This world view requires compassion and a willingness to act on it.

My experience has taught me that we live in a nation in which a jury is more likely to convict a black defendant who has committed a crime against a white. Even the dullest of blacks know this. There would be a lot more black-on-white crime if this were not the case.

However, my experience has also taught me that blacks are different by almost any measure to all other people. They cannot reason as well. They cannot communicate as well. They cannot control their impulses as well. They are a threat to all who cross their paths, black and non-black alike.

I do not know the solution to this problem. I do know that it is wrong to deceive the public. Whatever solutions we seek should be based on the truth rather than what we would prefer was the truth. As for myself, I will continue do my duty to protect the rights of all who need me.

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Originally published at – http://www.amren.com/features/2014/05/confessions-of-a-public-defender/

Details About Common Core You Need to Know

If you are concerned about Common Core or if you don’t understand the scope of the power and information it gives the Federal government — please read on. There are more concerns than just the convoluted way it “teaches” children to think… this is an awesome article from DCClothesline that explains some important details that parents and all Americans need to understand.

North Carolina House Votes to Drop Common Core

Wednesday, the North Carolina House passed a bill that would end the state’s involvement in Common Core educational standards, effectively nullifying its implementation within the state. The vote was 78-39. 

House Bill 1061 (HB1061) went through two hectic days. On Tuesday, the House Education Committee rewrote the original bill removing a number of sections that Common Coreopponents wanted out of the bill. They voted 27-16 to send the bill to the House floor, where it passed today on second and third readings.

Representatives opposing the bill on the House floor were worried that scrapping Common Core would leave North Carolina with no state standards for education. However, both primary sponsors of the bill, Reps. Larry Pittman and Michael Speciale assured the other members that that was not the case.

Common Core standards would continue to remain in place for the next year while North Carolina State Board of Education rewrites the standards for North Carolina’s schools. The reasoning behind the delay in scrapping Common Core is to smooth the transition back to a state-controlled curriculum. This would give the schools enough time to jettison the Common Core standards that have been foisted upon them without any undue harm being done to the development of students.

The primary committee amendment to the bill sets forth the principle that North Carolina by its constitution is responsible for the education of the citizens of the state and it will not cede or limit state control in exchange for federal funding for the public schools.

“The State Board shall ensure that no official, employee, agency, or board of the State shall enter into any agreement, memorandum of understanding, or contract with any federal agency or private entity which in any way cedes or limits State discretion or control over the development, adoption, or revision of the North Carolina Standard Course of Study and related student assessments in the public school system, including, but not limited to, agreements, memoranda of understanding, and contracts in exchange for funding for public schools and programs. “

Common Core gives the federal government the power to collect extensive data from students including Social Security numbers, records of school attendance, supposed learning disabilities, religious affiliation, disciplinary records and parent’s income information, the following committee amendment to the bill would strip that ability away from the federal government.

“No personally identifiable data on students or their families’ religions, political party affiliations, biometric information, psychometric data, or voting histories shall be collected, tracked, housed, reported, or shared with the federal government. No personally identifiable student data shall be collected for the purpose of the development of commercial products or services.”

HB1061 promotes decentralized government and takes control from unaccountable federal bureaucrats and puts it back into the hands of the people. Common Core’s proponents deceptively claim that the curriculum is not the handiwork of federal bureaucrats because it was conceived by the National Governors Association (NGA) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO). However, the NGA has received tens of millions in taxpayer dollars from the federal government over the course of many years.

Next, a companion bill will be considered on the Senate side. And if the two chambers pass differing versions, they’ll meet in conference committee to determine the final language that will be sent to the Governor’s desk for a signature

TAKE ACTION
In North Carolina: Take action today to make sure that HB1061 remains a strong rebuke against Common Core by clicking HERE.

For Other States: Check our Tracking and Action Center to see if your state has taken action against Common Core. If they haven’t, contact your state legislators and demand that they introduce legislation similar to HB1061. You can find your legislator’s contactinformation by clicking HERE.

http://www.dcclothesline.com/2014/06/09/north-carolina-house-votes-drop-common-core/

Response to Michelle Obama Comment about Knuckleheads on The Tonight Show

Likely you have heard about Michelle Obama’s appearance with Jimmy Fallon on The Tonight Show. While she was hanging out with him – she expressed her thoughts about young adults that haven’t signed up for The “Affordable Care Act”. In case you missed it – this is what she said — http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2VRzFBM6mUY

“Well, thanks to the Affordable Care Act, young people can stay on their parents’ insurance until they are 26. But once they hit 26 — they’re on their own. And a lot young people think they’re invincible. But the truth is, young people are knuckleheads. They’re the ones who are cooking for the first time and slice their finger open, they’re dancing on the bar stool.”

This is a great response to her — he makes very valid points.

 

Borrowing His Dad’s Car to go to School Ended Up in Felony Charges

At what point are people going to get back to using common sense?? This situation is a prime example of stupidity or people who don’t seem to have the ability, willingness or motivation to use their brain in an unusual situation… Let me know what you think about this problem….

A teen borrowed his father’s car to go to school and was stopped in a lock down – he agreed to have the car searched since HE didn’t have anything to hide. That set off a chain reaction of events that have seriously derailed his future and education…

On Thursday, Duren-Sanner, a senior at Northeast High School drove his father’s car to school. During a random lockdown, his car was chosen to be searched.

Duren-Sanner gave permission because he said he had nothing to hide.

His father is a commercial fisherman on the West Coast and had apparently left a fishing knife in the car. Duren-Sanner’s father said it might have been wedged between one of the seats.

Duren-Sanner said he told school officials and the Sheriff’s department the car was his father’s and he didn’t know the knife was in it.

“He’s like ‘it doesn’t matter it was in your possession anyway,’” Duren-Sanner said.

In an incident of absolutely monumental overreaction, the punishment was extreme, so much so that it threatens the boy’s future. Not only are his chances at a scholarship now in jeopardy, but he also faces felony charges.

School officials suspended him for 10 days, the maximum allowed underschool policy, and then he was reprimanded to attend 90 days at an alternative school.

Duren-Sanner has an appeal hearing on Wednesday with the school board.

If his punishment is upheld, Duren-Sanner will not be able to attend prom, his JROTC ball or walk at graduation. His family said it’s unclear whether he’ll be able to graduate at all.

Duren said her grandson has a 3.0 grade point average, is on the honor roll and he has never even been sent to the principal’s office She said scholarship applications have stopped since it is unclear what her grandson’s future is.

Duren-Sanner also faces weapons charges with the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Department.

Would you like to lend your support – the petition can be seen here – http://www.change.org/petitions/stand-up-for-student-david-duren-sanner-unreasonably-suspended-and-charged

Read the rest of the article here – http://www.newschannel5.com/story/24811452/clarksville-student-suspended-for-knife-in-fathers-car
 

If I Were The Devil

This post is not to make unnecessary inferences, but rather to make you think. Consider…this broadcast was made was 48 years ago. April 3, 1965. An amazing prediction. Do you remember the famous ABC radio commentator Paul Harvey?

Millions of Americans listened to his programs which were broadcast over 1,200 radio stations nationwide. If you are too young to remember, or never listened to Mr. Harvey, take the time to listen now. When you listen to this less-than-three-minute-long video, allow your thoughts to wander to the news today and the state of our country, and consider if there may be some, if not, lots of truth to the predictions made by someone who followed the media and was part of it so many years ago. At the time…our President was Lyndon B. Johnson.

Lyndon B. Johnson
36th U.S. President
Lyndon Baines Johnson, often referred to as LBJ, was the 36th President of the United States, a position he assumed after his service as the 37th Vice President of the United States. Wikipedia
Born: August 27, 1908, Stonewall, TX
Died: January 22, 1973, Stonewall, TX
Height: 6′ 4″ (1.93 m)
Vice president: Hubert Humphrey
Spouse: Lady Bird Johnson (m. 1934–1973)
Presidential term: November 22, 1963 – January 20, 1969

So….what do you think? Comments welcome.

Is It a Professor’s Job to Correct Grammar Mistakes – Evidently Not in Some Schools

Anyone who reads this blog is aware that I am sick of many things and people being accused of being racist – in stupid situations. The liberals don’t seem to understand that their complaints are “watering down” the impact of their claims. I blogged about that very topic and comparing their racist claims to the old story of the boy who cried wolf.

There is another story in the news – now a professor is being accused of being racist for correcting grammar etc mistakes for black students. Not pointing the finger at ANY race or ethnicity – but take a look at any social media for 5 minutes and tell me that people don’t need grammar lessons….

But back to this report from the Daily Caller –

Prof corrects minority students’ capitalization, is accused of racism

Racial tensions are inflamed at the University of California at Los Angeles following several incidents — most notably, one where a professor corrected the grammar, punctuation and capitalization in minority students’ assignments.

The act of correcting a black student was “micro-aggression,” according to the members of the student group “Call 2 Action: Graduate Students of Color,” which launched a sit-in during a subsequent meeting of the class.

“A hostile campus climate has been the norm for Students of Color in this class throughout the quarter as our epistemological and methodological commitments have been repeatedly questioned by our classmates and our instructor,” wrote the group in a statement to the college. “[The] barrage of questions by white colleagues and the grammar ‘lessons’ by the professor have contributed to a hostile class climate.”

Read the rest of the article here: http://dailycaller.com/2013/11/26/prof-corrects-minority-students-capitalization-is-accused-of-racism/#ixzz2nfHDl8Ig